Practical Automation Driver

  

To practice automation at every step of the development pipeline, you need the visibility to know where issues are introduced, and what the main sources of these issues are — faulty code, dependency issues, external attacks, insufficient resources, or something else. The causes can be innumerable, but logging gives you the insight you need to. Selenium is an open-source automation testing framework, which is used to validate web-based applications. It enables us to execute tests across different browsers and platforms. The Practical Automation ITL+ Plus series printers support a Continuous paper mode. This may also be referred to as Roll mode or Paper mode. This feature extends ticket printing capability from registration marked ticket stock to roll media which may not have any ticket separation perforations or marking on the bottom side. Ultimate QA is a world leader in providing services and training related to testing, automated testing, and software development. We help you create quality software.


While learning Selenium can surely be challenging in the shift from manual to automation, starting small and making the effort to be continuously learning will help you become proficient in no time.

CrossBrowserTesting wants to help your team get started with automated testing, which is why we’re creating Selenium 101 guides to teach you the basics. By the end, every software team will want you scripting tests for them.

Practical Automation Driver

For the first of the series, we’re starting at the very beginning by showing you how to automate a simple login process with Selenium using Python (because it’s one of the easiest programming languages to learn first).

You’ll want to install Python, Chrome Driver, and Selenium before starting. ChromeDriver will come in the form of an executable (Windows) or a binary (Mac/Unix). Those technical details aren’t too important now, but you’ll need the file itself. You can get the latest release of ChromeDriver here. Use the following command to add the Selenium library to Python.

You’ll also need to import some specific modules from Python’s Selenium library. At the bare minimum, you’ll need to do the following:

Finally, we need to actually start a webdriver. We can do so with only one line of code:

Now, we can get started automating a simple task like your website’s login form. Basically what we want to do is navigate to the website, locate the username and password fields, enter your credentials, and submit them to get past your login screen. You might also want to define a “method” (something you can call repeatedly) so you can reuse it within other tests. It’ll look something like this:

Automation

For example, if we were to be automating a Facebook login, it would look something like this:

There’s more than one way to locate the elements of your web application in order to find the username and password fields, and some may not always be available to you depending on the way your webpage was written. You can find elements by ID, as we exemplified, but you can also locate them by name, XPath, CSS Selectors, and more. To read about the different ways to locate elements during your login process, read Selenium’s official documentation.

Some pages use dynamic content (meaning lots of JavaScript!). To handle this effectively, we sometimes need to wait for some event to occur. To check and make sure that the login was successful, you might want locate an element on the page you’d land on after your login form by using a wait. We’ll need a few more components from the Selenium library. With the same example, you could do it by locating an element by like this:

Practical Automation Driver

The above code will wait a maximum of 10 seconds while attempting to find the “Home” button displayed when you first login to Facebook. Again, there are a few different ways to go about this including waiting for an element to be clickable, visible, or present on the page. You can read more about that here.

There you have it; this should provide a basic foundation for automating a simple login process with Selenium in Python. Take a look at the rest of our Selenium 101 series to continue on your journey to becoming a test automation master:

Practical Automation Drivers

Description
​Practical Automation typically ships printers configured per the customer’s order. There are times when the printer has to be reconfigured due to changes in the customer’s environment. This guide covers several common configuration change requirements which may occur after the printer leaves the factory.
​The Practical Automation ITL+ Plus series printers support a Continuous paper mode. This may also be referred to as Roll mode or Paper mode. This feature extends ticket printing capability from registration marked ticket stock to roll media which may not have any ticket separation perforations or marking on the bottom side.
​Printer configuration and option selection is done through a user interface consisting of the four push-button switches and context specific printed menus. This document is intended to assist a user in accessing and navigating the setup menus of the Practical Automation Plus series ticket printers.
QR CODE: This document applies to the QR Code implementation of Practical Automation Plus series FGL printers. “QR Code” is a registered trademark of DENSO WAVE.
Basic maintenance review for 38 Series printers - printhead alignment, pressure adjustment and cleaning, sensor alignment and adjustments, general paper path access
This simple guide will assist you in installing a new driver for a USB printer.
Basic instructions on how to uninstall an existing driver from Windows 7
Basic instructions on using the ITK1xG printer in either black mark or continuous mode